Renault Trucks
JOIN
THE CURRENT

Discover the major challenges
of urban electromobility

0%
of CO2 emitted by
an electric garbage truck.
0 times
less noise for an electric truck
compared to a diesel truck
driving in the city.
Easy
Less congestion in cities
in the daytime thanks to
silent electric trucks
making night deliveries mean.
0%
of a city’s deliveries can be
covered by 200km range
electric trucks.

MEET THE MOVEMENT'S PIONEERS

  • Philippe Bernard,
    Transport and Logistics Manager for Guerlain - Groupe LVMH

    Four years ago we wanted
    a fully electric truck
    for silent night deliveries.
  • Yannig Renault,
    Technical Director of Delanchy Transports

    Our main goal was to reduce noise
    and air pollution, since we deliver
    to a basement under Les Halles de Lyon.
  • François Savoye,
    Energy Efficiency Strategy Director - Renault Trucks

    For us, it is a no-brainer:
    the electric is the future of urban transport.

Let's switch together

Sharing is the driving force of the great changes.
Let's make noise on Twitter and Facebook to propel electromobility in our daily lives!

  • MADRILEÑOS,
    DON'T LET THE PUERTA DEL SOL TURN CLOUDY.

  • ROMAN PEOPLE,
    DON'T LET MONTE VERDE TURN GREY.

  • LONDONERS
    LET'S MAKE COVENT GARDEN GREEN AGAIN.

  • LET'S SHOW
    ELECTROMOBILITY ISN'T JUST HANNOVER DREAM.

  • PARISIANS,
    SHOW THE WORLD ELECTRIC TRANSPORT IS NOT THAT CLICHY.

  • BERLINERS,
    LET'S SPREE SOME POSITIVE ENERGY.

RENAULT TRUCKS, 100 YEARS OF INNOVATION
AND ELECTRICAL KNOW-HOW

  1. 1924

    The first electric truck:
    Berliet.

  2. 2004

    Launch of an electric garbage truck:
    Renault Puncher.

  3. 2007

    Trials with a hybrid electric truck:
    Renault Hybrys Tech.

  4. 2008

    Trial with a 3.5 t full-electric truck:
    Renault Maxity Electric.

  5. 2009

    Trial operation of a 16 t electric truck:
    Renault Midlum for Air France.

  6. 2010

    Launch of a 3.5 t full-electric truck:
    Renault Maxity Electric.

  7. 2011

    Launch of a 16 t hybrid truck:
    Renault Premium Distribution Hybrys Tech.

  8. 2012

    Trials with a truck with wheel-motors:
    Urban Lab 1.

  9. 2013

    Trial operation of a 16 t electric truck with range extender for
    N. Dentressangle:
    Renault Midlum.

  10. 2014

    Trial operation of a 16 t electric truck for Guerlain:
    Renault Trucks D.

  11. 2015

    Trial operation of a 4.5 t electric truck with hydrogen range extender for
    La Poste:
    Renault Maxity.

  12. 2017

    Trial operation of a 13 t electric truck for Delanchy:
    Renault Trucks D.

  13. 2018

    Launch of the 2nd generation of full electric light duty truck:
    Renault Master Z.E.

  14. 2019

    Launch of the 2nd generation of full electric medium duty trucks,
    16 t: Renault Trucks D Z.E. and 26 t: Renault Trucks D Wide Z.E.

THE ANSWERS TO YOUR QUESTIONS
ARE IN THE FAQ

What are the real benefits of switching to electric vehicles in cities?

We believe that electromobility is a solution to air and noise pollution in cities, and helps reduce overall CO2 emissions.
Electric trucks are silent, cleaner, and more efficient than combustion engine vehicles.
Regardless of any restrictions implemented in urban areas, electric trucks also reduce traffic congestion in cities, since they can be used during off-peak hours for silent deliveries.

Truck manufacturers promise to cut significantly CO2 emissions through electric trucks. Can we believe them?

Yes, the manufacturers are right: electric trucks do not produce any CO2 emissions in operation.
This is true. However, the production of energy to recharge electric vehicle batteries can emit CO2, depending on the production mode - fossil fuels (coal, gas, or petroleum), renewable energy (hydroelectric, solar, or wind power), or nuclear power. In Europe, where electricity is largely decarbonized, switching from a combustion engine to an electric vehicle can bring about a three- or four-fold reduction in CO2 emissions, depending on the country’s energy mix.

If all transporters in cities switched to electric power, what would the ecological balance look like?

That kind of estimate could only be theoretical, because each truck’s fuel consumption depends on its load, itinerary, number of stops, the driver’s technique, the weather, etc. Similarly, CO2 emissions from the electricity contained in the batteries varies greatly depending on the country and its energy mix.
Nevertheless, some comparisons are possible. For example, since a garbage truck makes many stops and has a heavy load, it consumes a great deal of fuel and emits large quantities of CO2 - on average, 159 kg for each daily round of 72 km.
In comparison, an equivalent electric vehicle, for the same task in Europe, only emits an average of 36.9 kg of CO2, which is 75% less.

The environmental impact is not limited to greenhouse gases. Do electric trucks emit particulate matter?

If we just look at the motor, an electric truck’s propulsion system do not produce pollutant emissions. However, if we take the truck in its entirety, regardless of its energy source (gas, diesel, electric, biofuel), it does emit fine particles resulting from the friction of tires on the road or the brake pad abrasion. These emissions are not specific to trucks: all vehicles, even two-wheelers such as bicycles, produce particles in operation and during braking.

Despite that, today electric trucks are the best solution to cut down the pollutant emissions and especially particles.

There is a lot of talk about the impact of battery production on the environment. What is Renault Trucks’ position on this topic?

Battery production is not neutral. Indeed, it consumes a great deal of electricity. Here again, it all depends on the country in which the batteries are produced, and how far along it is in its energy transition.
But the impact of batteries is not limited to their production. At Renault Trucks, we are mindful of the batteries' lifespan and we apply the 3 Rs: reduce, reuse, recycle.
- Reduce: through our knowledge of customers and our electromobility expertise to use the appropriate number of batteries.
- Reuse: with solutions to extend battery life through other uses, such as storing solar power or making homes energy self-sufficient.
- Recycling: battery recycling makes it possible to recover 99% of the material and reuse it to produce new batteries.

How can I personally contribute to a virtuous cycle in logistics, particularly in city centres?

More and more people are becoming aware of ecological issues and are adopting better practices in terms of consumption, waste reduction, and transport. Furthermore, while they expect city administrators to become more ecologically responsible, they don’t always understand the impact of the delivery of our consumer goods in cities. By supporting electromobility, they are completing the virtuous cycle of their daily efforts and contributing to the European Union’s objective to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050 as compared to 1990 levels.

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